Never Ever Again

Birkenau, Auschwitz, Concentration, Camp

Today, the BBC News reported on the 75th anniversary of the liberation of Auschwitz on 27th January 1945.

The overriding tone of the reports was a fear that people might forget what happened. One of the survivors commented that if you ask a young person what they know about Auschwitz, they might reply, “Who’s he?”

I do feel sad at the thought of what some humans are capable of. Not all. Many humans would not dream of committing such atrocities. But there are divisive issues brewing. There are many who are grumbling due to injustices and hardship. Even more disturbing, some people choose to entertain themselves with graphic violence in films and video games.

The world might not necessarily see these horrible extermination camps again. However, the attitudes, the sentiments, the propaganda that allowed Auschwitz to exist and operate is still rife in the world we live in.

The world desperately needs a real education. Not the type universites supply. An education for hearts and minds in what real love and real peace means. I long for the whole world to breathe a sigh a relief, knowing for sure that these things will never ever happen again.

7 thoughts on “Never Ever Again”

    1. I think many young people do get this. Seen Son watching videos about the Gas Chambers. Last week he was looking up Rwanda. But it’s the same as ever. Some don’t. Problem is that too often the people who get this stuff and not the ones who become leaders.

      Liked by 1 person

  1. I so agree with you. Years ago, I actually visited Dachau, near Munich. It was something I will NEVER forget. I am glad I had a chance to go. Yes, it was a horrible, horrible place, but people need to go. They need to see and remember so we NEVER do it again. Sadly, most younger people have no idea about these places and the actual atrocities that were committed.

    Like

    1. ❤ That must have been a deeply moving experience Jeanne ❤

      In my late teens and early twenties, I had the privilege of working on projects with some holocaust survivors. Their outlook on life shaped my view of what is important.

      Liked by 1 person

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